Team

Heidelberg University
Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe”
Voßstr. 2, Building 4400
69115 Heidelberg, Germany

 

Joachim Kurtz is Professor of Intellectual History at Heidelberg University. He has published extensively on late imperial and modern Chinese philosophy and thought. He is the author of The Discovery of Chinese Logic (Brill, 2011) and co-editor of New Terms for New Ideas (Brill, 2001). His research focuses on cultural and intellectual exchanges between China, Japan and Europe, with special emphasis on practices of argumentation, logic, political theory, rhetoric, translation studies, historical semantics, and the history of the book.

 
Universidad Autonoma de Madrid
Centro de Estudios de Asia Oriental
Calle de Francisco
Tomás y Valiente, 1
28049 Madrid, Spain

 

Taciana Fisac is Professor of Chinese Literature and founding director of the Centro de Estudios de Asia Oriental at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. She is the author of several pioneering translations of contemporary Chinese writers into Spanish and has published widely in English, Spanish and Chinese on themes relating to modern Chinese literature and its intersections with state ideology and censorship. Her current research traces the functions of motives and tropes from the European past in contemporary Chinese fiction.

 
London School of Economics and Political Science
Department of Government
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE, United Kingdom

 

Leigh Jenco is Associate Professor of Political Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is the author of Making the Political: Founding and Action in the Political Theory of Zhang Shizhao and Changing Referents: Learning Across Space and Time in China and the West. She situates her research and much of her teaching at the intersection of contemporary political theory and modern Chinese thought, emphasizing the theoretical and not simply historical value of Chinese discourses on politics.
 
Universität Zürich
Historisches Seminar
Karl Schmid-Strasse 4
8006 Zürich, Switzerland

 

Martin Dusinberre is Professor of Global History at the University of Zurich. His research focuses on the socioeconomic transformations in Japan and Asia from the mid-nineteenth century onwards; Japanese imperialism and imperial rivalries in and across the Asia-Pacific region; the history of Japanese and Chinese overseas diaspora communities; the movement of knowledge and goods across the Asia-Pacific region; the relationship between maritime histories and traditional land-based histories; and the wider challenges of studying connections and entanglements in the modern world.

Universidad Autonoma de Madrid
Centro de Estudios de Asia Oriental
Calle de Francisco
Tomás y Valiente, 1
28049 Madrid, Spain

 

David Mervart is Associate Professor of Japanese history and politics at the Centro de Estudios de Asia Oriental at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He has published in English, Japanese and Spanish on topics relating to his research in intellectual history of the early modern period with particular focus on eighteenth-century Japan within the worldwide web of knowledge.
  
Universität Zürich
Historisches Seminar
Karl Schmid-Strasse 4
8006 Zürich, Switzerland 

 

Birgit Tremml-Werner is a global historian working on transcultural encounters in South East Asia in the early modern period, and focuses on the growing research fields of both micro global history and a cultural history of diplomacy with concrete insights on verbal and non-verbal communication and diplomatic practices in Asian contact zones. She is currently working on her second book project on actor-based intercultural diplomacy with a focus on Tokugawa Japan’s foreign policy in the early seventeenth century and the overall impact of Spanish diplomatic performances in Asia (1565–1762) on the international order in the China Seas.

 
EHESS-CRH
GEHM (Bureau A 04-05)
54, boulevard Raspail
75006 Paris, France

 

Pablo Blitstein is an assistant professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris. He is co-founder and co-organizer of the Chinese history section of the Research Centre on the Slavic and Chinese Worlds (CEMECH) at the University of San Martín (Argentina), and the author of Les Fleurs du royaume. Savoirs lettrés et pouvoir impérial en Chine (Ve-VIe siècles) as well as of several articles and book chapters in English, French, and Spanish. His research focuses on text circulation, travel experiences and political imagination in late imperial and early republican China, as well as on the history of writing and political institutions in a global and conceptual history perspective.

 
Heidelberg University
Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe”
Voßstr. 2, Building 4400
69115 Heidelberg, Germany

 

Kyonghee Lee is a PhD candidate at Heidelberg University’s Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” with a previous academic background in philosophy and Sinology and work experience in publishing and knowledge management. Her MA thesis was an attempt at an intellectual history of the concept of the Kingly Way in East Asia, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth century, when the emergence of a world culture saw a reorganization and a repositioning of the concept as a part of the new international language of political thought. She is currently working on her doctoral project “Conservative-reformist visions of rural self-governance in East Asia in the interwar period”.
Heidelberg University
Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe”
Voßstr. 2, Building 4400
69115 Heidelberg, Germany
  

 

Lorenzo Andolfatto is a research fellow at Heidelberg University’s Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context”. His research interests expand between early-modern Chinese literature, comparative literature, and translation studies, focusing on the study of late Qing fiction, utopian writing, and science fiction. Currently he is working on the book Paper Worlds: Chinese Utopian Writing at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century, currently under review by Brill and scheduled for publication in 2018.
London School of Economics and Political Science
Department of Government
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE, United Kingdom

 

Jon Chappell is a postdoctoral research fellow at the London School of Economics. An historian of modern China’s relationship with foreign empires in the treaty port century (1842–1949), he is currently focusing on the enhanced Qing colonial project on Taiwan between 1874–95, when Qing officials used European technologies and methodologies to strengthen their control over the island’s mountainous interior and its indigenous population.
Universidad Autonoma de Madrid
Centro de Estudios de Asia Oriental
Calle de Francisco
Tomás y Valiente, 1
28049 Madrid, Spain

 

Daniel Sastre is Junior Lecturer of East Asian art history at the Centro de Estudios de Asia Oriental, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He has curated exhibitions of Japanese woodblock prints and published on the topics bordering on intellectual history and history of art. His current research concerns the birth of the discipline of art history in Japan and the adaptation of the art periodization schemes from European models.